Blog News of Note — August 6, 2010

Posted on August 7, 2010


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News stories and commentary not to be missed:

  • The Republican National Committee voted today to change the way the Republican Party will nominate its presidential candidates.  Instead giving all delegates from a state to the winner, they will be allocated proportionally according to the voting results for each state.  The changes will hopefully prompt candidates to focus less on large states with numerous delegates at the expense of small states with fewer delegates.
  • Twitter guy @ChrisBarnhart has a great post over at David Horowitz’s News Real Blog entitled “I Like Ann Coulter, Ergo I Hate Myself”  It isn’t so much about Ann Coulter, but more about the political left and their intolerance of minorities (in this case, gays) who don’t support them.
  • Apparently, Representative Charlie Rangel (D-NY), who faces 13 House ethics charges (after almost 2 years of investigation) seems to think that taking a plea bargain is an “English, Anglo-Saxon procedure.”  Unbelievably (or maybe not),  Rangel is trying to make his ethics violations about race instead of his own personal actions.  He is using the race card because here, at the end of his career, has no other defense.  This man, who is the Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, which is responsible for writing the TAX CODE, is accused (among other things) of failing to pay income taxes on a rental property he owns.   Trying to make this about his race is ludicrous and only shows how arrogant a 20-term (that’s 40 years) House Representative can become when ensconced in a “safe” district. 
  • The defense lawyer representing the accused terrorist teen, Omar Khadr, wants less of a “military show of force” at the teen’s military tribunal.  The lawyer argues that the standard atmosphere could prejudice the jury against his client. 
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