Durbin sees increased border security as bargaining chip for DREAM Act support

Posted on May 17, 2011


U.S. Senator Richard Durbin, of Illinois.

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There’s a reason Arizona is pursuing private funding and the building of a border fence where the federal government has failed to do so.  It’s because, in the eyes of many Democrats, increased security along our southern border is not a necessity but only a negotiating tool to further their political agenda:

Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin invited Minority Whip Jon Kyl on Sunday to privately discuss ways to move forward on comprehensive immigration reform.

“Here’s the offer I’ll make to Jon Kyl and [Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)]: I will sit down with you, I will work with you to have border security beyond what the president’s done — and I think we’ve done an enormous, made an enormous investment there,” Durbin (D-Ill.) said while appearing with Kyl (R-Ariz.) on “Fox News Sunday.”

[…]

Durbin added, I will go even further to make sure that our border is safe and to stop, as much as humanly possible, illegal immigration, if you will join with us in comprehensive immigration reform so that we can identify those living in this country, we can give the children under the DREAM Act an opportunity to have a good life in this country and we can finally fix this broken system.” (emphasis mine)

What Senator Durbin is doing is making the security of our country contingent upon Republicans agreeing to give a “pathway to citizenship” to some who are here illegally.   This raises the question, “Why should we be relegating ANY aspect of our security to the political whims of politicians?”  Shouldn’t our nation’s safety be a nonpartisan issue?  Shouldn’t security issues stand alone in their implementation? Shouldn’t immigration reform and U.S. security be two issues which are considered separately? 

Senator Durbin’s willingness to use the southern border as a bargaining chip in his political aspirations is reprehensible. Unfortunately, it’s just politics as usual in D.C.

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